Molecular Mechanisms

The first goal of the Center is to understand the fundamental molecular mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and differentiation using human embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, and stem cells in simpler organisms that are useful models for the study of developmental biology. Computational methods and systems biology approaches will be applied to understand intricate networks of genes and proteins.

Affiliated Faculty

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

The Clegg Laboratory focuses its research on the molecular basis of neural development and disease; retinal development and degeneration; differentiation of ocular cells from embryonic and adult stem cells. 

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Research in our lab is based around the phenomenon of self/non-self recognition (allorecognition) in a primitive chordate organism, Botryllus schlosseri.

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Beginning with a long-standing interest in molecular mechanisms underlying the normal development and maintenance of the nervous system, our work has evolved to include a major effort to understand neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, FTDP-17 and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Our investigations focus upon the normal and pathological action of the microtubule associated protein, tau. 

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Our lab investigates how sperm and egg interact and how this interaction results in launching the developmental program. We use single cell molecular and imaging techniques, high throughput proteomics platforms and network analyses, and cell biological approaches in several marine invertebrate model systems.

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Study of basic cellular and molecular processes that cause the blinding human disease known as age-related macular degeneration.

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

We work on neural plasticity including the molecular basis of plasticity, the evolution of synapses, and disease-related impairments of plasticity such as occurs in Alzheimer's disease.

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

The current research in our lab is centered in two areas: Membrane trafficking/cell migration and histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases and covalent modifications of histones regulate the structure and function of chromatin. As well as AGS3 and addiction. 

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Research in the Marth laboratory is centered upon protein glycosylation in the cell biology of disease.

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Denise Montell’s lab has recently discovered a surprising reversibility of the cell suicide process known as apoptosis. A second major interest of the lab focuses on cell motility. 

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

A central question in neurobiology is defining the molecular and cellular mechanisms through which animals translate sensory input into behavioral outputs. Our lab is focusing on dissecting how animal behaviors are influenced by changes in temperature, light input, gustatory and olfactory cues, and mechanical forces. To tackle this problem, we are using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, because it allows us to employ a combination of molecular, cellular, biochemical, electrophysiological and genetic approaches to study the link between sensory signaling and animal behavior.

Chemistry & Biochemistry

The Reich lab is investigates the complexity of cellular machinery on two fronts: to elucidate role of DNA binding enzymes in the epigenetic disposition of gene expression and suppression; and the design of nanoparticle tools to harness cellular processes for therapuetic and investigative purposes. 

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Regulation of development and differentiation; regulation of programmed cell death and cell division; mechanisms of tumorigenesis

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

My laboratory focuses on morphogenetic mechanisms in the tunicate Ciona.

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

My research focuses on understanding how a cell can maintain or change identity, how a cell chooses between self-renewal and the initial decision to differentiate, and how a differentiated cell with limited developmental potential can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent cell.

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Research in the Weimbs Laboratory is centered around Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), SNAREs, and epithelial cell polarity.